Tag Archive for 'public domain'

Celebrating the Public Domain 2021

2021 has finally arrived, and as always, the new year brings another celebration: Public Domain Day. This is a big deal. Why? Because the public domain means that works can be used and modified by anyone without authorisation. As such, this enriches the range of books, articles, art and beyond […]

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Guest Blog: The Passenger Pigeon Manifesto

This is a guest blog by Adam Harangozó, a freelance creative worker. Our past is crucial in understanding our present. It offers us knowledge and insights that help us to evaluate the world we live in today – the way we live our lives, structure our economies, and relate to […]

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Opening up collections in Libraries supports creativity

More and more libraries are working to open data from heritage collections. Many institutions (the Library Brasiliana Guita e Jose Mindlin in Brazil, the Auckland Libraries – Heritage Images in Australia or the Library Centrală Universitară “Lucian Blaga” in Cluj-Napoca for instance) are turning to digital, in line with the […]

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In the Public Interest? Promoting the Public Domain

1 January was Public Domain Day. Around the world, advocates for access to culture celebrated the possibility to share books and other materials more broadly, and to make creative new uses of them. Libraries were well represented. For our institutions, entry into the public domain means that there are new […]

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Copyright Week Day 3: Public Domain, Privatised Knowledge, and Libraries

1 January 2019 saw a greater than usual focus on the importance of the public domain. For the first time in 20 years, new works started to go out of copyright in the United States, following a 20 year hiatus. There was a lot of celebration – and performances of […]

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Because Markets Fail: Libraries and the Public Domain

Intellectual property rights – copyrights included – are designed to create a market for ideas and expressions. Without them, the argument goes, there is no way of earning money from a work or product, and so no incentive to create. The right to enjoy the material benefits of a work […]

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