Monthly Archive for October, 2015

LGBTQ at Malmö City Library

        Malmö City Library is Sweden first big city library to become LGBTQ certified. More than 125 employees receive training in new mindsets and skills for meetings with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people. The training, that is carried out by RFSL (the Swedish Federation for […]

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Lighting the Way: Libraries and Wellbeing

Papers from CILIP’s Public and Mobile Libraries Group Conference Lighting the Way: Libraries and Wellbeing are now available on their website. Held in Staffordshire on 9-10 October there were a range of presentations and workshops exploring the health, social and economic aspects of our contribution to a better and stronger […]

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Photo exhibition “Terra mia” and Charity

Our colleague, Natia Merlino from Italy has sent this story about a great initiative the  Municipal Library Nicola Pitta has undertaken to support the children of Africa. This too demonstrates how libraries are making a difference in our world. The City of Apricena, the Department of Culture, and the Library […]

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Trouble and unrest in Swedish libraries

        Trouble and unrest at the libraries, quiet libraries, or libraries for conversations and events? The debate has been heated in Sweden recently and fuel has been added to this debate by the Union for Academics, DIK, which has released an interim report about the library staff’s […]

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Responding! Public Libraries and Refugees

Libraries throughout the world have a strong history of responding to natural disasters and humanitarian crises providing a welcoming environment, a place of refuge for body and soul, and a source of information. As we have watched the refugee crisis unfold in Europe we have been flooded with examples of […]

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‘Reading Holiday’ in Sweden

        The result of the PISA survey 2012, published in 2013, was a real wake up call for Sweden, as it revealed that Swedish pupils performed significantly worse than students in other OECD countries in terms of literacy.  As a reaction to this negative result, a number […]

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